Aftercare

Sash Windows Aftercare

Renovation is just the first step in looking after your doors and windows. With a little bit of careful maintenance, you can make sure they stay in great condition for up to 100 years – far beyond that of uPVC or aluminium.

Water penetration

This should be avoided at all costs, so we not only recommend clearing away debris such as dead leaves from any sills or corners, but also being mindful of other external elements such as a leaky drainpipes / guttering or rising damp. The design of our windows and doors ensures that normal rainwater will clear away without any harm.

Cleaning seals and glass

Excess dirt and grease can stop seals from working properly. You can prevent this from happening by cleaning your windows with a soft cloth, using a weak solution of washing-up liquid and warm water, and finishing with a wipe of clean water.

Brushes

The brushes on a draught proofing strip shouldn’t need too much cleaning, but if they do, clean with a stiff brush and wash with a mild detergent.

Hinges and window catches

You can stop these from rusting by giving them a wipe down and lightly oiling or spraying them with a lubricant such as WD40.

Sun and rain

Wood is an organic material, meaning it responds to rain and changing temperatures with a slight swelling or shrinking. This is completely natural, and you may find your windows and doors to be slightly looser in hot, dry weather and slightly tighter in cold, wet weather. However, proper draught sealing will account for this movement, meaning it shouldn’t affect the performance of your doors or windows.

Removing old paint (only applicable for renovations)

If you’d like to repaint your renovated window, you might need to sand the old paint first. You should do this with caution – always wearing a suitable protective dust mask.

Masking the glazing

You can protect the sash or casement window glass from paint by placing masking tape and/or cloth over the glass pane.

Painting your sash windows

Please make sure you paint and new joinery/windows within 6 weeks of completion. Apply a good quality primer, top coat and gloss to ensure a quality finish and well protected timber. Do not paint onto the glass, except with the final coat, which should overlap onto the glass by about 1mm to protect the seal. Bear in mind that painting might be easier with a “sash trim brush”, which is slightly angled to reach into 90-degree corners and tight spaces.

Linseed paints can often provide the best form of protection, and we would recommend brands such as the Linseed Paint & Wax Co., which are also solvent-free.